40 Million Americans Have A Communication Disorder

Communication Disorder

During Better Hearing and Speech Month, we raised a lot of awareness of the importance of knowing the signs of speech, language, hearing and auditory processing disorders.

In the United States, 40 million individuals are diagnosed with a communication disorder. This can include speech disorders, which occur when a person is unable to produce speech sounds correctly or fluently, or has problems with their voice. Additionally, individuals can be impacted by language disorders which occur when a person has trouble understanding others (receptive language) or sharing thoughts, ideas and feelings completely (expressive language). #knowthefacts

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Jody Vaynshtok

Jody is a California-licensed speech language pathologist with eight years of industry and clinical experience. She has worked with both adult and pediatric populations during her time at private practice, birth-to-three, and hospital facilities. She is experienced in the assessment and treatment of a variety of communication and cognitive disorders. In addition, Jody has a passion for working with adults looking to achieve clearer communication. Jody received her BS in Speech and Hearing Sciences and MS in Medical Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Washington. She was a part of the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford’s cleft and craniofacial clinic participating in the multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of children born with craniofacial abnormalities. She holds a staff position at UCSF and is the lead speech language pathologist for the department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery’s Hearing Loss Clinic. When she's not busy having fun with her clients Jody enjoys spending time with her husband, Anton, friends and family. And if she's not headed out somewhere fun for dinner, you might find her at Bar Method working out!

Diaper Drive for Help A Mother Out

As a part of Better Hearing and Speech Month, we are working with a local non-profit, Help A Mother Out, to collect diapers during our Mother’s Day diaper drive! Help A Mother Out is a non-profit organization that works to improve baby and family well-being by increasing access to diapers for families in need. We’re collecting diapers all month long - just drop by our office to donate.

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Speech Delay in Children

Speech Delay

The stages of speech and language development are the same for all kids, but the age at which kids develop them can vary a lot.

It's important to know the signs of a speech and language delay, and to seek out an evaluation if any concerns exist. How do you know if there is a delay or if the signs you are seeing are alarming?

Signs fo a language disorder, as identified by the American Speech and Language Association, can include:

  • Does not smile or interact with others (birth and older)

  • Does not babble (4-7 months)

  • Makes only a few sounds or gestures, like pointing (7-12 months)

  • Does not understand what others say (7 months-2 years)

  • Says only a few words (12-18 months)

  • Words are not easily understood (18 months-2 years)

  • Does not put words together to make sentences (1.5-3 years)

  • Has trouble playing and talking with other children (2-3 years)

  • Has trouble with early reading and writing skills* (2.5-3 years)

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Jody Vaynshtok

Jody is a California-licensed speech language pathologist with eight years of industry and clinical experience. She has worked with both adult and pediatric populations during her time at private practice, birth-to-three, and hospital facilities. She is experienced in the assessment and treatment of a variety of communication and cognitive disorders. In addition, Jody has a passion for working with adults looking to achieve clearer communication. Jody received her BS in Speech and Hearing Sciences and MS in Medical Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Washington. She was a part of the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford’s cleft and craniofacial clinic participating in the multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of children born with craniofacial abnormalities. She holds a staff position at UCSF and is the lead speech language pathologist for the department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery’s Hearing Loss Clinic. When she's not busy having fun with her clients Jody enjoys spending time with her husband, Anton, friends and family. And if she's not headed out somewhere fun for dinner, you might find her at Bar Method working out!

Hearing Loss Directly Impacts Quality of Life

Impacting Quality of Life

A scientific review of a large number of studies shows that the use of hearing aids causes significant improvement in the quality of life of those with hearing loss. The results of all studies reviewed are remarkably consistent.

The review is published in the scientific report, "Evaluation of the Social and Economic Costs of Hearing Impairment". The report presents the results of a comprehensive study of almost all scientific research on social and economic impacts of hearing loss in Europe, Australia and the United States. Overall improvements in quality of life, overall improved health, and preceived higher cognitive function from famaily members were among some of the key points highlighted in the study. #themoreyouknow

Source: "Evaluation of the Social and Economic Costs of Hearing Impairment", October 2006, Hear-it AISBL

Comment

Jody Vaynshtok

Jody is a California-licensed speech language pathologist with eight years of industry and clinical experience. She has worked with both adult and pediatric populations during her time at private practice, birth-to-three, and hospital facilities. She is experienced in the assessment and treatment of a variety of communication and cognitive disorders. In addition, Jody has a passion for working with adults looking to achieve clearer communication. Jody received her BS in Speech and Hearing Sciences and MS in Medical Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Washington. She was a part of the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford’s cleft and craniofacial clinic participating in the multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of children born with craniofacial abnormalities. She holds a staff position at UCSF and is the lead speech language pathologist for the department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery’s Hearing Loss Clinic. When she's not busy having fun with her clients Jody enjoys spending time with her husband, Anton, friends and family. And if she's not headed out somewhere fun for dinner, you might find her at Bar Method working out!

Absolutely Incredible Kid Day

Every year, on the third Thursday of March, thousands of adults send notes, emails, letters, texts, videos (you choose!) to encourage and inspire young people across the country, during Absolutely Incredible Kid Day.

2019 AIKD is March 21.

Participating in AIKD is a simple, meaningful way to let youth know how much they are appreciated. Words are powerful – young lives are changed by this day and simple act of your encouragement, love, and kindness.

Join Sound Speech and Hearing Clinic in letting a kid (or 2 or 3) in your life know just how awesome they are! We’ll have letterhead available at our front desk all week long, and will send out a letter to your child, niece, nephew, or family friend so that it arrives in their mailbox March 21st.

Comment

Jody Vaynshtok

Jody is a California-licensed speech language pathologist with eight years of industry and clinical experience. She has worked with both adult and pediatric populations during her time at private practice, birth-to-three, and hospital facilities. She is experienced in the assessment and treatment of a variety of communication and cognitive disorders. In addition, Jody has a passion for working with adults looking to achieve clearer communication. Jody received her BS in Speech and Hearing Sciences and MS in Medical Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Washington. She was a part of the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford’s cleft and craniofacial clinic participating in the multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of children born with craniofacial abnormalities. She holds a staff position at UCSF and is the lead speech language pathologist for the department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery’s Hearing Loss Clinic. When she's not busy having fun with her clients Jody enjoys spending time with her husband, Anton, friends and family. And if she's not headed out somewhere fun for dinner, you might find her at Bar Method working out!

Hearing Loss Is The Third Most Prevalent Chronic Condition

Hearing_loss_is_treatable

Did you know hearing loss is the third most common health problem in the United States. Heart disease and arthritis are the only two conditions that impact more Americans that hearing los. #themoreyouknow

Comment

Jody Vaynshtok

Jody is a California-licensed speech language pathologist with eight years of industry and clinical experience. She has worked with both adult and pediatric populations during her time at private practice, birth-to-three, and hospital facilities. She is experienced in the assessment and treatment of a variety of communication and cognitive disorders. In addition, Jody has a passion for working with adults looking to achieve clearer communication. Jody received her BS in Speech and Hearing Sciences and MS in Medical Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Washington. She was a part of the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford’s cleft and craniofacial clinic participating in the multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of children born with craniofacial abnormalities. She holds a staff position at UCSF and is the lead speech language pathologist for the department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery’s Hearing Loss Clinic. When she's not busy having fun with her clients Jody enjoys spending time with her husband, Anton, friends and family. And if she's not headed out somewhere fun for dinner, you might find her at Bar Method working out!